Clifton W. Callaway, MD, PhD

Professor of Emergency Medicine; Executive Vice-Chairman of Emergency Medicine; Ronald D Stewart Endowed Chair of Emergency Medicine Research



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412-647-3078
Fax: 412-647-6999
400A Iroquois
Pittsburgh, PA 15260

Education

1996 Emergency Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Affiliated Residency

1993 MD, University of California, San Diego

1992 PhD, University of California, San Diego

1987 AB, Harvard University

Biography

Dr. Callaway studies resuscitation medicine with special emphasis on brain injury after cardiac arrest. He has developed a translational research program devoted to the topic of resuscitation from sudden death. Emphasizing the continuity of care during resuscitation, he has collaborated with prehospital care providers and emergency physicians to study acute cardiac interventions, developed a platform to study intensive care interventions, and worked with partners in rehabilitation to study long-term outcomes after cardiac arrest. Work in prehospital care has led to studies about acute monitoring and regionalization of care. Work with emergency providers has stimulated interest in provider safety and wellness, particularly related to shift-work and sleep deprivation. Basic laboratory investigations support and are informed by this clinical work.

 

Awards

Publications

Rittenberger JC, Guyette FX, Tisherman SA, DeVita MA, Alvarez RJ, Callaway CW. Outcomes of a hospital-wide plan to improve care of comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Resuscitation. 2008 Nov;79(2):198-204.

Raina KD, Callaway C, Rittenberger JC, Holm MB. Neurological and functional status following cardiac arrest: method and tool utility. Resuscitation. 2008 Nov;79(2):249-56. 

Wang HE, Abella BS, Callaway CW; American Heart Association National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Investigators. Risk of cardiopulmonary arrest after acute respiratory compromise in hospitalized patients. Resuscitation. 2008 Nov;79(2):234-40. 

Hostler D, Rittenberger JC, Roth R, Callaway CW. Increased chest compression to ventilation ratio improves delivery of CPR. Resuscitation. 2007 Sep;74(3):446-52.

Callaway CW, Hostler D, Doshi AA, Pinchalk M, Roth RN, Lubin J, Newman DH, Kelly LJ. Usefulness of vasopressin administered with epinephrine during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Am J Cardiol. 2006 Nov 15;98(10):1316-21. 

Nichol G, Thomas E, Callaway CW, Hedges J, Powell JL, Aufderheide TP, Rea T, Lowe R, Brown T, Dreyer J, Davis D, Idris A, Stiell I; Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Investigators. Regional variation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest incidence and outcome. JAMA. 2008 Sep 24;300(12):1423-31. Erratum in: JAMA. 2008 Oct 15;300(15):1763. 

Logue ES, McMichael MJ, Callaway CW. Comparison of the effects of hypothermia at 33 degrees C or 35 degrees C after cardiac arrest in rats. Acad Emerg Med. 2007 Apr;14(4):293-300. 

Callaway CW, Ramos R, Logue ES, Betz AE, Wheeler M, Repine MJ. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor does not improve recovery after cardiac arrest in rats. Neurosci Lett. 2008 Nov 7;445(1):103-7. 

Callaway CW, Rittenberger JC, Logue ES, McMichael MJ. Hypothermia after cardiac arrest does not alter serum inflammatory markers. Crit Care Med. 2008 Sep;36(9):2607-12.

Ho Y, Logue E, Callaway CW, DeFranco DB. Different mechanisms account for extracellular-signal regulated kinase activation in distinct brain regions following global ischemia and reperfusion. Neuroscience. 2007 Mar 2;145(1):248-55. 

POTENTIAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

Royalties and Patents:

2000 US Patent # 6,438,419. C.W. Callaway and L.D. Sherman. “Method and apparatus employing a scaling exponent for selectively defibrillating a patient.” Licensed to Medtronic ERS, Inc. --- This has never been commercialized and is not in any product. but was licensed by the University of Pittsburgh to Physio-Control where it has generated a licensing fee paid to the University.

2000 US Patent # 6,174,875. D.B. DeFranco, C.W. Callaway, C. Lipinski, and N. Xiao. “Benzoquinoid ansamycins for the treatment of cardiac arrest and stroke.”

2008 US Patent # 7,444,179 B2. L.D. Sherman, C.W.Callaway, J.J. Menegazzi. “Devices, Systems and Methods for Characterization of Ventricular Fibrillation and for Treatment of Ventricular Fibrillation.”

Dr. Callaway was paid Honoraria to lecture, as well as travel to and from the following:

Managing the Patient At Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death - Sudden Cardiac Arrest Association (SCAA) - Pittsburgh, PA - October 8, 2010. ---This was a CME Symposium organized by SCAA in Pittsburgh, PA. SCAA is a nonprofit, tax exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Contributions to SCAA are tax deductible. SCAA has been supported by donations from manufacturers of resuscitation devices. (http://associationdatabase.com/aws/SCAA/pt/sp/about )

Raising the Bar for Post Arrest Care - Take Heart Austin - Austin, TX - October 29, 2010 --- This was a CME Symposium for Take Heart America. “Take Heart America is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation incorporated in Minnesota. Take Heart America has been supported by donations from manufacturers of resuscitation devices (http://takeheartamerica.org/aboutus.htm)

Keeping it Cool - How to Implement Hypothermia in Your Clinical Practice - Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) - April 22-23, 2010 ---This was a CME Symposium organized by SCCM in Pasadena, CA.

Post-Cardiac Arrest Symposium - St. Mary's Hospital - Seoul, South Korea, December 18, 2010 --- This was a CME Symposium organized by the Catholic University of Korea in Seoul, Korea.

Hypothermia and Resuscitation Training Institute at Penn - “Predicting neurological outcome after cardiac arrest.” - University of Pennsylvania, July 7-8, 2011. ---This is a CME Symposium offered by the University of Pennsylvania.

Research Support:

Dr. Callaway currently receives funding from the National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, and Department of Defense. He has received a loan of equipment for laboratory studies, without financial support or restrictions, from Medivance, Inc. (a manufacturer of hypothermia devices).